Paul Madson

THOUGHTS, QUOTES & REFLECTIONS

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Remembering Billy Graham (1918 – 2018)

Years ago, Billy Graham said,

“Someday you will read or hear that Billy Graham is dead. Don’t you believe a word of it. I shall be more alive than I am now. I will just have changed my address. I will have gone into the presence of God.”

Justin Taylor compiled a list of TGC’s coverage of Billy Graham’s life and legacy…

A Few New Quotes to Note

“Visit many good books, but live in the Bible.” (Charles Spurgeon)

“It is much harder to look down on the sin of others when you are looking up at Jesus, who took your sin on the cross.” (Garrett Kell)

“Man is at his greatest and highest when upon his knees he comes face to face with God.” (Martyn Lloyd-Jones)

“You may not feel like praying. You may be tired and even bored. But God welcomes you just as you are. Spend a few minutes talking with Him. God’s presence is not the same as the feeling of God’s presence and He may be doing most for us when we think He is doing least.” (C.S. Lewis)

“When you pray, four persons are involved. The Father listens. The Spirit helps, and the Son intercedes. A Christian never prays alone.” (Colin Smith)

“Believe God’s love and power more than you believe your own feelings and experiences. Your rock is Christ, and it is not the rock that ebbs and flows but the sea.” (Samuel Rutherford)

“We must not allow our emotions to hold sway over our minds. Rather, we must seek to let the truth of God rule our minds. Our emotions must become subservient to the truth.” (Jerry Bridges)

When it comes to studying God’s Word, remember… “Raking is easy, but you get only leaves; digging is hard, but you might find diamonds.” (John Piper)

“We must allow the Word of God to confront us, to disturb our security, to undermine our complacency and to overthrow our patterns of thought and behavior.” (John Stott)

“Every human being—regardless of color, nationality, economic status, or intellect—has been created in the image of God and should be treated with dignity and respect.” (Kevin DeYoung)

“Runners in a distance race… always try to keep something in reserve for a final sprint. And my contention is that, so far as our bodily health allows, we should aim to be found running the last lap of the race of our Christian life, as we would say, flat out. The final sprint, so I urge, should be a sprint indeed.” (J.I. Packer)

“There are no sunset years for the Christian. Until the day you die, you have a race to run and a ministry to finish. Or, you can waste your life. But it’s better to lose your life than to waste it.” (John Piper)

Loving People: Not as They Deserve, Not as They Love, Not as We Need

A while back, Scotty Smith wrote on the topic of loving others – and how we can fully and freely do so only when Jesus is our sole satisfaction and deepest identity. Scotty wrote this as a prayer, but I’ve reworded it as a brief article. Enjoy.


Of all the pits easy to fall into, being too impacted by how people relate to us is the pit with the deadliest toxins in it. When people have too much power over our hearts, their approval can be as addictive as heroin or money. Their criticism can paralyze and kill us, like the venom of vipers. Their distance can fuel our anxieties and intensify our shame.

All of us want our relationship with Jesus to be the most defining reality in our lives—our greatest peace, joy, and hope.

We need to regularly ask God to restore to us the joy of our salvation; to renew our experience of His delight in us; to refresh our hearts in His everlasting love and unfailing kindness.

Only God’s love is better than life.

We need to be freed to relate to people and love them, “as unto the Lord,” as an act of worship—whether our kindness is acknowledged, reciprocated, or ignored.

We need to ask God to help us break the cycle of letting people be the thermostat in our lives. People will always make lousy saviors. Nobody can be Jesus to us but Jesus; and we dare not take on Jesus’ role in other people’s lives.

We need to be grateful that our heavenly Father doesn’t despise our weaknesses or brokenness, even when we have to confess the same things to Him over and over.

We long for the Day when we will be made perfect in love.

Until that Day, Lord, we ask that you would keep freeing us from our “people idolatries.”

“Serve wholeheartedly, as if you were serving the Lord, not people.”
(Eph. 6:7 NIV)

“Obviously, I’m not trying to win the approval of people, but of God. If pleasing people were my goal, I would not be Christ’s servant.”
(Gal. 1:10 NLT)

“The LORD is for me, so I will have no fear. What can mere people do to me?”
(Psalm 118:6 NIV)

“I have loved you with an everlasting love; I have drawn you with unfailing kindness.”
(Jer. 31:3 NIV)

(Bold and italics mine)

Starting is Half Done

Did you make any New Year’s Resolutions (or set goals) for this new year?

Two of the most common goals people set are…

1) Attend to my spiritual life more consistently, and

2) Attend to my physical life more consistently (usually meaning exercise and diet).

Whether you are still on track with your goals, or have already fallen behind in the first 10 days of this year (which is more common than most people think), here is one suggestion I’ve found helpful over the years that has helped to increase my consistency in all areas of my life.

Starting is half done

Many times, half the battle is just getting started.

I enjoy long-distance running, but unfortunately, I don’t always feel like doing it on my scheduled days. On the tough days, I’ve found that if I simply tell myself to “change into your running clothes and put your running shoes on… and walk out the door” (I run on a trail in my neighborhood), 99% of the time I actually end up running.

The same could be said about personal devotions.

Make a plandetermine a time, a place (your desk, a comfortable chair, your office, etc.) and what you will do during that time each day.

For example:

  • Bible Reading (15 minutes) (read three chapters in the OT and one chapter in the NT).
  • Prayer (15 minutes) (use the C.T.S. acronym to guide you as you pray – Adoration, Confession, Thanksgiving, Supplication). Make a simple prayer list of things you want to specifically pray and thank God for each day.

Then if you want to add writing in a journal or Scripture memory and meditation (which I highly encourage), you can do so.

This will give you a plan of what to do when you sit down to have your devotions.

Also, as a side note, I would discourage having your digital device(s) on (or even near you) when you have your devotions.

We live in the most distracted culture in history… we need to push against the prevailing winds of “always on technology” in our world today.

If there is ever a time when we should truly “disconnect” digitally, it is when we are seeking to enjoy God’s presence and refocus our heart and mind.

A healthy spiritual life comes as we make small daily decisions to interact with God and His Word and seek to apply what we learn to our lives.

Sit down in your “place,” at your “time” and open your Bible…and start.

Starting, many times, is half done.

Walking with a Limp

I’ve always had an interest in learning what lessons others have gleaned throughout their pastoral ministry – in particular, as they look back upon their years with greater wisdom and insight. I wrote my own series of what I’ve learned over my first 30 years in ministry back in 2010 here.

I share many of my own lessons with pastors all over the world. And what never ceases to amaze me is how the stories and lessons learned are so similar, even across diverse cultures… whether in Africa, Asia or Latin America. We’re all made in the image of God. We’re all broken sinners in need of a Savior… no matter where we live.

A few months ago Kevin DeYoung, Sr. Pastor of Christ Covenant Church in Matthews, NC and board chairman of The Gospel Coalition, wrote about what he has learned in his years of ministry.

Here are two of the thoughts he shared…


“I often tell people that when I came to URC I told the search committee that my philosophy of ministry boiled down to three P’s: preach, pray, and be with people. Those are all really good. They’re still what I want to do in ministry.

“But I’ve had to learn a fourth P, and that is patience.

“I know I was naïve in how change happens—how long it takes to address things and how you have to build up trust and confidence.

“I always joke about when I first came there were some particular issues that I told the elders would be taken care of in six months. Then I said, well maybe in another six months. Then I said six years. And now I think, well, maybe in heaven.

“I know I’ve learned about patience…

“There are lots of little things you learn as a pastor, and some of them are simply part of growing up. …

“…And here’s the last thing I’ll mention. It goes back to the Bible story about Jacob wrestling with the angel. You remember, Jacob is touched in the hip socket and starts walking with a limp. It is true: given enough years, everyone ends up walking with a limp.

“It’s not all equal by any means.

“I’ve had less suffering than most other people. But if you live long enough, you’ll find that everyone is hurting.

“You’ll discover people’s marriages aren’t as good as they seem, or their kids are more troubled than they let on, or there’s a miscarriage or infertility, or there’s a parent who’s sick, or someone whose death is still the source of constant sadness, or there is a strained relationship, or there is an addiction, or there is an invisible illness.

“There’s just a lot of pain out there.

“Everyone you talk to is a sinner and a sufferer.

“As a young person filled with good theology, it’s easier to know the sinner part. And we can’t forget this, otherwise we will be poor friends, and I’ll be a poor pastor. Compassion without follow through or correction is not real love. But that’s only one part of the equation.

“You have to remember people are carrying around a lot of hurt, a lot of sadness, a lot of fears. I’ve had to learn that people are not just sinners; they’re sufferers too. And that shapes how you deal with sin and extend mercy. I hope I’ve learned that.”

Click here to read the full article by Kevin DeYoung.

What is your life’s mission statement?

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Almost 30 years ago, I took several days during a vacation to evaluate all that I was doing and to state in one brief sentence what my purpose in life was (my Mission Statement) – i.e. Why do I get out of bed in the morning? What is it that drives me day in and day out?

The statement I wrote back then has been a guiding compass over the last few decades. I still have this statement as part of my daily prayer list to help keep me centered on what is most important.

Here is my life’s mission statement…

When I come to the end of my life and have nothing but death to look forward to and nothing but memories to look back upon, I want to be able to say that I sought to be…

• God’s man (2 Cor. 5:15; 1 Thess. 2:4)
• in God’s place (Acts 20:24)
• doing God’s work (1 Cor. 3:6-8; 1 Cor. 15:58)
• for God’s glory! (1 Cor. 10:31; Phil. 1:21; 1 Peter 4:10-11)

To explain what I mean by those four brief statements:

  • I don’t want to be “my own man” (or as Frank Sinatra said, “I Did It My Way”). I only want to be God’s man.
  • I don’t want to do ministry in someone else’s place; only the place that God has called me… no matter where that is or how small and seemingly insignificant.
  • I don’t want to do anyone else’s work, only the work that God has called me to do (Acts 20:24).
  • And finally, my ultimate reason for living, my reason for breathing air each day, my reason for taking up space on this dust chip called planet earth, is to live for God’s glory. Not my glory. Not some ministry’s glory. Only God’s glory. It’s not about me. It’s about Him.

What’s your mission statement? If you haven’t written one, I would encourage you to do so.

Quotes to Note – Fall 2017

“The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only one page.” (Augustine)

“I look in the mirror and say, ‘What is a young man like me doing in an old body like that?’” (Haddon Robinson)

“Two things are said to be rare sights in the world; one is a young man humble, and the other is an old man content.” (J.C. Ryle)

“To be loved but not known is superficial. To be known and not loved is our great fear. But to be known and loved is what will transform us.” (Dr. Timothy Keller)

“A book I’m reading states that there are 4 kinds of people.
1. Those who make things happen.
2. Those who watch things happen.
3. Those to whom things happen.
4. Those who have no clue what’s happening.
I’m determined to be in the 1st category. How about you?”
(Dr. David Sills)

“You are always responsible for how you act, no matter how you feel.” (Anonymous)

“Death and sorrow are merely a middle chapter.” (Scott Sauls)

“Men fall in private long before they fall in public.” (J.C. Ryle)

“If you understand what holiness is, you come to see that real happiness is on the far side of holiness, not the near side.” (Dr. Timothy Keller)

“But this is what I know: God is who He says He is. In the hurt and the pain and the suffering, God is near, and He is good, even when the ending isn’t. It’s not, ‘They lived happily ever after,’ but, They leaned into an unknown future with a very knowable Father.’” (Ann Voskamp)

“We would be more patient and kind with people and less hurt if we regularly remembered that we all have deep core faults.” (Dr. Timothy Keller)

“The poet James Allen Francis noted: ‘All the armies that ever marched, and all the navies that ever were built, and all the parliaments that ever sat, all the kings that ever reigned, put together have not affected the life of man upon this earth as powerfully as has that One Solitary Life.’”

“Fighting sheep are strange animals, and fighting Christians are self-evident contradictions.” (C.H. Spurgeon)

“God sees us as we are, loves us as we are, and accepts us as we are. But by His grace, He does not leave us as we are.” (Dr. Timothy Keller)

“The weakness of your faith
will not destroy you.
A trembling hand
may receive a golden gift.”
(C.H. Spurgeon)

“Unhealthy leaders, when criticized, will spin, manipulate, and regroup. Healthy leaders, on the other hand, will confess and repent.” (Scott Sauls)

“No man is worse for knowing the worst about himself. If an X-ray reveals a serious break in one of your bones, do you blame the X-ray? Do you break the thermometer if it shows you with a fever of 105? Would you blame a doctor for informing you of a life-threatening situation? In the same way, when God talks about sin, it’s the diagnosis of the very disease He wants to cure. God condemns sin because He redeems from sin! We can’t receive His forgiveness by redefining sin; don’t let anyone deceive you into thinking that something the Bible calls sin is normal and not necessarily wrong. God says He condemns it—but only because He can redeem you from it. Are you willing to hear all that He says?”
(Darryl DelHousaye)

“Maturity is always a return to the reality about yourself.”
(Dr. Joseph C. Aldrich)

“Motivation is what gets you started. Habit is what keeps you going.” (Jim Ryan)

“It is only an infinite God, and an infinite good, that can fill and satisfy the precious and immortal soul of man.” (Thomas Brooks)

“Christ followers contract malaria, bury children, and battle addictions, and as a result, face fears. It’s not the absence of storms that sets us apart. It’s whom we discover in the storm: an unstirred Christ.” (Max Lucado, from his new book Fearless)

“Like it or not, each of us is personally at war with the Devil, for the Devil has personally declared war upon each of us.” (J.I. Packer)

“How does Satan accuse us? By causing us to look at our sin rather than our Savior.” (Dr. Timothy Keller)

“We cannot add time; we can only exercise stewardship over the time we are given.” (Albert Mohler)

“Do not be anxious about what may happen tomorrow; the same everlasting Father who cares for you today will take care of you tomorrow and every day. Either He will shield you from suffering, or He will give you unfailing strength to bear it. Be at peace, then, put aside all anxious thoughts and imaginations.”
(St. Francis de Sales)

“I used to think of life as a highway with lots of potholes along the way. Now, I see it as a country road with a smooth place every once in a while.” (Haddon Robinson)

“In Jesus, God battles our sin with reassurance not shame, kindness not punishment, mercy not judgment, love not abandonment.” (Scott Sauls)

“I’ve never regretted seeking to understand the best representatives of a position I disagree with. I do regret my hasty, uninformed responses.”
(Scotty Smith)

“I wonder if I’ve ever done anything out of a pure motive. How in the world could I ever hope to have relationship with a righteous God? I find myself thinking that I can’t. So, I live with grace. If you knew me like God knew me, you probably wouldn’t like me. The marvel of the Bible is that God is gracious.” (Haddon Robinson)

“Life is hard. God is good. Glory is coming. Therefore, stand firm in his grace. Rejoice in hope, fill your life with good deeds, and show the world that God is gloriously satisfying.” (John Piper)

“The moment we say don’t give me doctrine, don’t give me all that Bible stuff, just give me Jesus, just strip it down to the basics — is the moment we become culpable of a fallacy. The Bible is the very book on which Jesus based His entire life.” (Scott Sauls)

The Practical Blessings of Humility, Forgiveness and Gratitude

Christianity Today recently published an article I found fascinating. The article shared the results of studies that show the practical benefits that come to a person who readily forgives others, practices gratitude and demonstrates humility in their relationships.

Here’s a short excerpt from the original article (with the tongue-in-cheek title of “What Brilliant Psychologists Like Me Are Learning About Humility” by Mark R. McMinn)…

“…For example, studies have now found a striking array of benefits around forgiveness. Compared to less-forgiving peers, forgiving people have lower blood pressure; lower bad cholesterol and resting heart rates; improved sleep and immune systems; less depression, anxiety, and anger; enhanced relationships; more optimism; and a greater sense of overall well-being.

“Similarly, grateful people view their lives more favorably than others, have increased energy and self-confidence, and demonstrate better coping. They are more generous and optimistic, have a greater sense of purpose, have fewer medical problems, exercise more, and sleep better than their peers.

“As with forgiveness and gratitude, humility fosters physical, mental, and relational health. Humble people are more grateful and forgiving, so they enjoy the benefits of those virtues. They are also more generous and helpful than others, have better romantic relationships, have less anxiety about death, and experience less spiritual struggle. They perform better at school and work, show more compassion to others, and even have better self-esteem than less humble people.”

Click here to read the entire article.

Quotes to Note – Fall Edition

“Life is not measured by length but by depth. Birthdays tell us how long we have been on the road, not how far we have travelled.”  (Vance Havner)

“Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance, the only thing it cannot be is moderately important.” (C.S. Lewis)

“We need to be reminded more than we need to be instructed.” (G.K. Chesterton)

“Christianity can be summed up in the two terms faith and love… receiving from above [faith] and giving out below [love].” (Martin Luther)

“Kindness makes a person attractive. If you would win the world, melt it, do not hammer it.” (Alexander MacLaren)

“God’s design in our pain enables us to look back and say: He loves me enough to take me where I would have never wanted to go in order to produce in me what I never could have achieved on my own.” (Paul David Tripp)

“God is our portion, Christ our companion, the Spirit our Comforter, Earth our lodge, and Heaven is our home.” (C.H. Spurgeon)

“The storms of life no more indicate the absence of God than clouds indicate the absence of the sun.”  (John Blanchard)

“Pain insists upon being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our consciences, but shouts in our pains. It is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world.” (C.S. Lewis)

“The safest road to hell is the gradual one – the gentle slope, soft underfoot, without sudden turnings, without milestones, without signposts.” (C.S. Lewis)

“No one expects to attain to the height of learning, or arts, or power, or wealth, or military glory, without vigorous resolution, strenuous diligence, and steady perseverance. Yet we expect to be Christians without labor, study, or inquiry.” (William Wilberforce)

“Humility is not thinking less of yourself, it’s thinking of yourself less.” (C.S. Lewis)

“Discipleship: When Jesus said to make disciples, the disciples understood that to mean that they should make out of others what Jesus has made out of them.” (Don Whitney – Professor at Southern Seminary, Louisville, KY)

“Grace and truth are both necessary. Neither is sufficient. Christ’s heart is equally grieved by grace-suppression and truth-suppression, by grace-twisting and truth-twisting. ‘For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ’ (John 1:17).” (from The Grace and Truth Paradox by Randy Alcorn)

“Some want to live within the sound of church or chapel bell; I want to run a rescue shop within a yard of hell.” (C.T. Studd)

“Your approval before God is woven into the life and sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the cross, not what other men and women think about you.” (Matt Chandler)

“Man is indeed lost, but that does not mean that he is nothing. We must resist humanism, but to make a man a zero is not the right way to resist it … [The] Christian position is that man is made in the image of God and even though he is now a sinner, he can do things that are tremendous – he can influence history for this life and the life to come, for himself and for others… From the biblical viewpoint, man is lost, but great.” (Francis Schaeffer)

“An honest preacher’s prayer: Lord, by your Spirit, may your people hear a better sermon than the one I am about to preach.” (Kevin DeYoung)

The Best Quotes from 12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You

Pastor Scott Slayton recently posted some of the best quotes from Tony Reinke’s excellent new book 12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You. Eye-opening and well worth reading. Enjoy!


The Best Quotes from 12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You 
by Pastor Scott Slayton

This year I have been giving time to reading on the effects that our digital culture is having on our lives. This journey is taken me through some works that are not explicitly Christian like Deep WorkThe Lonely AmericanIrresistible, and Alone Together. (This week I picked up World Without Mind and The Tech-Wise Family, which is explicitly Christian.) Tony Reinke approaches the issue from a God-centered perspective in his book 12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You. In looking at how we think about and use our phones, he explores the inner workings of our hearts and causes us to see how something that seems as harmless as a glance at a screen can have serious spiritual repercussions.

In these “best quotes” posts, I usually like to share my favorite twenty. For Reinke’s work, I started with a list of over fifty and had a difficult time cutting them down. This is an important book and I hope these quotes whet your appetite. These are the best quotes from 12 Ways Your Phone is Changing You.

“If we must give an account of every idle word, we are probably the first generation that can truly appreciate the volume of our idle words, since we have published more of them that any group in human history.” (24)

“The glowing screen on my phone projects into my eyes the desires and loves that live in the most abstract corners of my heart and soul, finding visible expression in pixels of images, video, and text for me to see and consume and type and share. This means that whatever happens on my smart phone, especially under the guise of anonymity, is the true expose of my heart, reflected in full-color pixels back into my eyes.” (27)

“We find ourselves in the middle of this garden-to-city unfolding of history, and God is governing the entire process in several ways. Between the guardrails of natural law, as well as the guardrails of the abundance and scarcity of certain raw materials in the earth, and carried forward through his image bearers, each wired for innovation, the trajectory of technological progress–from the garden to the city–was set in motion. This process is entirely initiated, intended, and guided by God.” (31)

“We check our smartphones about 81,500 times each year, or once every 4.3 minutes of our waking lives.” (41)

“As digital distractions intrude into our lives at an unprecedented rate, behavioral scientists and psychologists offer statistical proof in study after study: the more addicted you become to your phone the more prone you are to depression and anxiety, and the less you are able to work and sleep at night.” (43)

“The human appetite for distraction is high in every age, because distractions give us an easy escape from the silence and solitude whereby we become acquainted with our finitude, our inescapable mortality, and the distance of God from all our desires, hopes, and pleasures.” (45)

“Distraction management is a critical skill for spiritual health, and no less in the digital age.” (51)

“My phone can connect me to many friends, but it can also decouple me from an expectation for real-life engagement. When I go into my social media streams, too often I use Facebook to insulate me from the real needs of my friends. Facebook becomes a safe and sanitized room where I can watch the ups and downs as an anonymous spectator, with no compulsive impulse to respond and care in any meaningful way.” (53)

“Our typing thumbs lack empathy without living faces in front of us. It is much easier to slander an online avatar than a real-life brother.” (59)

“Maybe this is a key function of church attendance in the digital age. We must withdraw from our online worlds to gather as a body in our local churches. We gather to be seen, to feel awkward, and perhaps to feel a little unheard and underappreciated, all on purpose. In obedience to the biblical command not to forsake meeting together, we each come as one small piece, one individual member, one body part, in order to find purpose, life, and value in union with the rest of the living body of Christ.” (72)

“The more time I spend reading ten-second tweets and skimming random articles online, the more it affects my attention span, weakening the muscles I need to read Scripture for long distances. But before we delete our Bible apps, we should consider that studies also tell us that Christian readers are more faithful to follow digital Bible reading plans on smartphones (with daily prompts) than print plans and offline reading.” (85)

“Photography is a blessing, but if we impulsively turn to our camera apps too quickly, our minds can fail to capture the true moments and the rich details of an experience in exchange for visually flattened memories.” (98)

“It’s awkward to say it this way, but like Narcissus staring down into the water, enchanted with himself, we bend over our phones–and what most quickly captures our attention is our own reflection: our replicated images, our tabulations of approval, and our accumulated ‘likes.’” (109)

“In the digital age, we idolize our phones when we lose the ability to ask if they help us (or hurt us) in reaching our spiritual goals.” (115)

“The smartphone is causing a social reversal: the desire to be alone in public and never in seclusion. We can be shielded in public and surrounded in isolation, meaning we can escape the awkwardness of human interaction on the street and the boredom of solitude in our homes. Or so we think.” (124)

“Every attempt to bleach-wash our digital footprint is vain. You can delete the most immature images from your Twitter, Instagram and Facebook feeds. But nothing you do on your phone, have ever done on your phone, or will ever do on your phone is secret. Eternal regret will follow forever for private smartphone clicks happening right now. Before God, our browsing history remains a permanent record of our sin and shame–unless he shows mercy. Before his omniscient eyes, our browsing history can be washed clean only with the blood of Christ.” (138)

“When I grow bored with Christ, I become bored with life–and when that happens. I often turn to my phone for a new consumable digital thrill. It is my default habit.” (143)

“In all the noise, we must embrace our freedom in Christ, as we step back from the onslaught of online publishing and the proliferation of digital sages. By grace, we are free to close our news sources, close our life-hacking apps, and power down our phones in order to simply feast in the presence of friends and enjoy our spouses and families in the mystery, majesty, and ‘thickness’ of human existence.” (151)

“Christians, perhaps like never before, are tempted to remain tethered to the daily news cycle, viral videos, political forecasts, and entertainment gossip. Our hyperconnection is fueled by our FOMO. We hate being left out, so we focus on every Next Big Thing, such as the upcoming blockbuster film. And we forget about big, glorious realities like the inbreaking new creation of God.” (155)

“There’s a very real temptation for those who are not called into a certain situation to attempt to judge cases remotely, make premature conclusions, and then attract an online groundswell of support. But crowdsourcing verdicts and spreading unfounded conclusions online can destroy the reputation of a Christian.” (166)

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